Parental Coaching for Unmarried Parents

Book an Assessment

If you are an unmarried parent, chances are that you share visitation rights and custody of your child or children. And while every parent intends on working together to coexist and raise children peacefully, that is not always the reality of the situation. Many times, ex-partners find themselves bickering, complaining about parenting choices or disagreeing on topics relating to their children. It’s not uncommon for these issues to take over the spotlight while the needs of the children move to the back burner.

If you are an unmarried parent, chances are that you share visitation rights and custody of your child or children. And while every parent intends on working together to coexist and raise children peacefully, that is not always the reality of the situation. Many times, ex-partners find themselves bickering, complaining about parenting choices or disagreeing on topics relating to their children. It’s not uncommon for these issues to take over the spotlight while the needs of the children move to the back burner.

Our goal at Sharp Divorce Coaching for unmarried parents is to help two adults who are raising children reorient themselves and their mindsets to who is most important as a parent–your child. We help you address and discuss pain points that you both are experiencing and shine the light of reality on many of the issues you are facing.

Our goal at Sharp Divorce Coaching for unmarried parents is to help two adults who are raising children reorient themselves and their mindsets to who is most important as a parent–your child. We help you address and discuss pain points that you both are experiencing and shine the light of reality on many of the issues you are facing.

Q.

I have full custody of my children. Do I need to worry about co-parenting?

A.

If you share any visitation at all with your children, co-parenting coaching can be beneficial for you, especially if you are experiencing any type of conflict with the other parent. And if the other parent does not have visitation currently, that can change at any time and having support to navigate any sudden changes in your custody arrangement can be a benefit.

Q.

Can I force someone into co-parenting coaching?

A.

While co-parenting coaching does work best when both parents are willing to take part, you can’t force someone to participate in co-parenting coaching. However, it can still be beneficial because this support service really helps to understand what you can and cannot control and adjust your mindset to worrying about your own behaviors and how that can affect your children. We help you regain control of your actions, rise above any immaturity and be the model parent your child needs.

Q.

How is this different from a parenting coordinator provided by the court?

A.

Usually if a court provides any type of custody moderator or official to oversee the custody arrangements, they are only working on behalf of the court and the law. Co-parenting coaching with us provides emotional support and suggestions for how to weed out the important co-parenting conflicts from the pettiness and work together to create a happier and healthier environment for your children.

Q.

How do we reduce conflict?

A.

When you have children with someone–regardless of whether or not you stay in a relationship or marriage–you are connected to that other person for life. So reducing conflict within a co-parenting situation is pivotal in raising emotionally healthy and adjusted children. Each family’s situation is unique, but the key to finding harmony between households is to learn how to work together and keep your children the focus on your relationship. We can help you discover straightforward ways to mitigate issues and smooth over the cracks of the weak spots in your parenting so that you provide the strong, stable environment that your children need.

Q.

Can you give me legal advice surrounding my custody arrangement?

A.

Lindsey Sharp cannot provide legal advice in this capacity.

Q.

Can you provide co-parenting assistance for families with step children?

A.

As unmarried parents move on and possibly remarry or have more children, or invite other children from a new relationship into their lives, the co-parenting landscape becomes a little more complex. Blended families can really benefit from this coaching because it helps to level-set on expectations and discuss how situations may vary from household to household for each child and how all parents can work together to create one seamless and cohesive family across all the children’s lives.